Archive for the ‘Diabetes’ Category

MEDICAL NUTRITION THERAPY FOR TYPE I DIABETES

For patients with type I diabetes, medical nutrition therapy should emphasize the interrelationships among food, exercise, and insulin. Those receiving conventional insulin therapy must maintain consistency in the timing and amount of their food intake. Ideally, the insulin plan should be designed to match the patient’s preferred eating pattern. Earlier, the nutrition recommendations were for total calories and carbohydrates to be ‘fractionated’ between meals and snacks based on the insulin regimen. This is no longer recommended because it does not promote individualization. However, the timing of food intake should be synchronized with the administration of insulin. Because of the limitations of a conventional insulin regimen (i.e., 1 to 2 insulin injections per day), patients on such a regimen may need to alter their usual eating habits by incorporating consistency with timing and amounts of food.
Patients receiving intensive insulin therapy, i.e., multiple daily injections or pump infusion, have considerable flexibility in when and what to eat. Nevertheless, they too need to integrate their insulin regimen with their lifestyle and adjust the insulin doses when they deviate from their usual eating and exercise patterns. These patients can adjust their pre-meal insulin dose to compensate for deviation from their meal plan and exercise programme. Even with the increase in flexibility, the more consistent they are with their eating and physical activity, the easier is the overall management.
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MEDICAL NUTRITION THERAPY FOR TYPE I DIABETESFor patients with type I diabetes, medical nutrition therapy should emphasize the interrelationships among food, exercise, and insulin. Those receiving conventional insulin therapy must maintain consistency in the timing and amount of their food intake. Ideally, the insulin plan should be designed to match the patient’s preferred eating pattern. Earlier, the nutrition recommendations were for total calories and carbohydrates to be ‘fractionated’ between meals and snacks based on the insulin regimen. This is no longer recommended because it does not promote individualization. However, the timing of food intake should be synchronized with the administration of insulin. Because of the limitations of a conventional insulin regimen (i.e., 1 to 2 insulin injections per day), patients on such a regimen may need to alter their usual eating habits by incorporating consistency with timing and amounts of food.Patients receiving intensive insulin therapy, i.e., multiple daily injections or pump infusion, have considerable flexibility in when and what to eat. Nevertheless, they too need to integrate their insulin regimen with their lifestyle and adjust the insulin doses when they deviate from their usual eating and exercise patterns. These patients can adjust their pre-meal insulin dose to compensate for deviation from their meal plan and exercise programme. Even with the increase in flexibility, the more consistent they are with their eating and physical activity, the easier is the overall management.*3/356/5*

Posted on December 28th, 2010 by admin  |  No Comments »