Archive for the ‘Cardio & Blood-Cholesterol’ Category

REDUCING YOUR RISK OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE: ELEVATED CHOLESTEROL – THE NATURE OF CHOLESTEROL

The main types of lipoproteins are low-density  lipoprotein  (LDL)  and high-density lipoprotein (HDL). They are often referred to as LDL cholesterol and HDL cholesterol. HDL contains almost 50 percent protein and 20 percent cholesterol; LDL contains about 25 percent protein and 45 percent cholesterol. Another type of lipoprotein,   very low-density  lipoprotein (VLDL), contains mostly triglyceride and small amounts of protein and cholesterol.
The function of LDL is to transport cholesterol to sites throughout the body where it is used to repair the membranes of cells is deposited. Thus, LDL tends to promote accumulation of cholesterol in the walls of your arteries, somewhat in the manner that hard water promotes a buildup of lime inside the plumbing of your house. However, cholesterol deposits are spotty, rather than an even coating throughout the “pipes.”
HDL, however, mainly has the task of carrying cholesterol to the liver, where it is alerted and removed from the body. In a sense, HDL is like a “clean-up” crew that sops up excess cholesterol in the system and disposes of it before it can do any damage by accumulating where it is not needed.
LDL cholesterol is mainly to blame for the risk that is associated with cholesterol. The opposite is true for HDL cholesterol: because it works to eliminate excess cholesterol, the more HDL you have, the less cholesterol will deposit in atherosclerotic plaques. Therefore, a relatively low ratio of LDL to HDL is desirable for lowering your risk for development of coronary artery disease.
The role of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol predetermining the risk of coronary artery disease is not well defined. A high level of VLDL seems to be an independent risk factor in women, but not in men._A high level of tryglicerides responds to a high level of VLDL cholesterol.
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REDUCING YOUR RISK OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE: ELEVATED CHOLESTEROL – THE NATURE OF CHOLESTEROLThe main types of lipoproteins are low-density  lipoprotein  (LDL)  and high-density lipoprotein (HDL). They are often referred to as LDL cholesterol and HDL cholesterol. HDL contains almost 50 percent protein and 20 percent cholesterol; LDL contains about 25 percent protein and 45 percent cholesterol. Another type of lipoprotein,   very low-density  lipoprotein (VLDL), contains mostly triglyceride and small amounts of protein and cholesterol.The function of LDL is to transport cholesterol to sites throughout the body where it is used to repair the membranes of cells is deposited. Thus, LDL tends to promote accumulation of cholesterol in the walls of your arteries, somewhat in the manner that hard water promotes a buildup of lime inside the plumbing of your house. However, cholesterol deposits are spotty, rather than an even coating throughout the “pipes.”HDL, however, mainly has the task of carrying cholesterol to the liver, where it is alerted and removed from the body. In a sense, HDL is like a “clean-up” crew that sops up excess cholesterol in the system and disposes of it before it can do any damage by accumulating where it is not needed.LDL cholesterol is mainly to blame for the risk that is associated with cholesterol. The opposite is true for HDL cholesterol: because it works to eliminate excess cholesterol, the more HDL you have, the less cholesterol will deposit in atherosclerotic plaques. Therefore, a relatively low ratio of LDL to HDL is desirable for lowering your risk for development of coronary artery disease.The role of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol predetermining the risk of coronary artery disease is not well defined. A high level of VLDL seems to be an independent risk factor in women, but not in men._A high level of tryglicerides responds to a high level of VLDL cholesterol.*239\252\8*

Posted on December 21st, 2010 by admin  |  No Comments »